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Become a Human Book at the Human Library

Do you have a story to tell? Do you want to help challenge stereotypes, stigma, and misconceptions and generate a culture of acceptance?


Do you have valuable experiences that readers could benefit from learning about?

If you have experienced prejudice due to issues relating to race, sex, age, disability, sexual preference, gender identity, class, religion/belief, lifestyle choices or other aspects of who you are, volunteer to become a Human Book, and share your story.

What is a Human Book and how does it work?

A Human Book is a person who volunteers to represent a stigmatised group in the community based on their personal experiences and can answer questions from readers to help challenge what is being said/told/understood about a given topic. Example books titles might include, someone with autism, a disabled person, an ex-offender. The possibilities are endless.

A reader will then choose to ‘read,’ talk with a Human Book at the Human Library event. The Human Book will invite the reader to ask questions based on their story.

Manchester Metropolitan University Library will be hosting the Human Library on Wednesday 26th February from 12pm until 4pm in the Chat Zone, All Saints Library.

Register to be a Human Book

If you feel you have something to contribute, please register as a Human Book at the Human Library. You will be reviewed by the Human Library Organisation and provided with additional information – please specify on your application that you wish to volunteer for the event at Manchester Met on the 26th Feb.

Complete the online form to register as a Human Book

The deadline for becoming a Human Book is Friday 14th February.

On becoming a Human Book, you must commit to attending the training scheduled to take place on 19th February at Manchester Met (alternative arrangements can be made if you are unable to make this date). You will then need to commit to spending some time as a Human Book on Wednesday 26th February, 12-4 – you will also be free to borrow other Human Books on offer.

If you wish to only register to attend the event as a reader, you can do so by signing up on Eventbrite.

If you have any questions or would like to know more, please contact the library at library@mmu.ac.uk. You can also contact us by phone on 0161 247 6106.

Updated: 08 January, 2020

Manchester Met Library's Resource Discovery Day 2020

Thursday 23rd January, 10:00am – 2:00pm, Geoffrey Manton Atrium

Manchester Met Library is welcoming our major online suppliers and some of Manchester’s finest libraries, museums and archives to showcase their amazing resources.

They’ll be helping you find the best materials for your research and teaching, much of which you’ll be entirely unaware of! Come along, have a coffee and a chat and explore a new resource. It’s a superb opportunity to discover some of the incredible collections held here in Manchester!

Featuring:

  • Adam Matthew – Mass Observation Archive; Migration to New Worlds; Popular Culture in Britain and America, 1950-1975

  • Ahmed Iqbal Race Relations Centre – a wonderful library specialising in the study of race, ethnicity and migration, an absolute mine of information!

  • Bloomsbury – Berg Fashion Library; Churchill Archive; Classical Studies & Archaeology

  • Gale – Academic OneFile; InfoTrac Newsstand; Gale Literary Sources; Archives Unbound; British Library Newspapers; Times; Daily Mail; Literature Criticism Online; MLA Bibliography; Punch

  • JISC Historical Texts – Early English Books Onine (EEBO); Eighteenth Century Collections Online (ECCO); British Library 19th Century

  • JISC – Archives Hub; Library Hub Discover; Journal Archives

  • Manchester Met Library – find out how your own library can support your learning, research and teaching!

  • Manchester Public Libraries – find out about the incredible services our local public libraries offer!

  • North West Film Archive – the team will be sharing some of their wonderful collection of footage from the region.

  • People’s History Museum – a fantastic collection telling the story of democracy in Britain, reflecting the ideas, campaigns and movements fighting to achieve equality, social justice and co-operation.

  • ProQuest – Applied Social Sciences Index & Abstracts (ASSIA); Cecil Papers, ERIC; FIAF International Index to Film Periodicals Database; The Guardian, Library & Information Science Abstracts (LISA); Linguistics & Language Behavior Abstracts (LLBA); New York Times, Washington Post, Women’s Magazine Archive

  • Sage – thousands of journals plus the awesome Sage Research Methods

  • Working Class Movement Library – Working people have always struggled to get their voices heard. The Working Class Movement Library is a treasure trove with records of over 200 years of organising and campaigning by ordinary men and women.

Updated: 08 January, 2020

MMU Harvard Referencing

New workshop dates available

Make sorting out your references easier with this introduction to the MMU's Harvard style. We'll show you how to reference the most common type of material as well as giving you guidance on tackling those trickier references you discover for your work.

Tuesday 21st January 12:00 – 13:00, Business School 3.07

Updated: 02 January, 2020

Workshop: Literature reviews: searching for articles and research papers effectively

New date added for February

Please note: we have changed the title of this workshop recently from: Preparing for your research project/dissertation: searching for articles and research papers effectively. The content has been updated too, however the process and techniques for locating academic literature remains unchanged and the workshop is described below. Time to crack on with your literature review and don’t know where to start? This hands on session will help you to plan your searches and use time saving search techniques to find the most relevant academic sources. Learn how to use subject specific databases to find high quality academic journals and research papers.

Monday 3rd February 14:00 – 15:00, John Dalton C1.02

Updated: 11 January, 2019

Workshops: Endnote Online

New dates available

Not only does EndNote order and organise the references that you use during your academic life, but it can take the pain out of referencing by inserting citations and references in the exact way your tutor has requested. So if you forget where your italics and fullstops go, learning EndNote can take the pain out of your reference list.

Endnote covers a number of referencing styles for you to explore, however for our workshop, we will focus on the MMU Harvard style available within EndNote.

Tuesday 21st January 11:00 – 12:00, Geoffrey Manton GM.115,

Updated: 30 October, 2019

Workshops: Endnote Online

New date added

Not only does EndNote order and organise the references that you use during your academic life, but it can take the pain out of referencing by inserting citations and references in the exact way your tutor has requested. So if you forget where your italics and fullstops go, learning EndNote can take the pain out of your reference list.

Endnote covers a number of referencing styles for you to explore, however for our workshop, we will focus on the MMU Harvard style available within EndNote.

Tuesday 21st January 11:00 – 12:00, Geoffrey Manton Building, GM.115

Wednesday 31st January 13:00 – 14:00, Geoffrey Manton Building, GM.119

Thursday 6th February 13:00 – 14:00, Geoffrey Manton Building, GM.119

Updated: 02 January, 2020

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